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Events + Promo

Zupynka Redux

Max Rykov
Video installation (4 min)

Part of PRESERVATION duo-exhibition with Colton Teri.
Washington, D.C., November 2023.

Part 
Reflections on the fading art form of Ukrainian mosaic bus stops are displayed between three CRT televisions in Zupynka Redux. The performance was shot at the Academy of Arts, Architecture, and Design (UMPRUM) in Prague, incorporating mosaic fragments and flyposting advertisements that once plastered damaged bus stops. 

The installation includes supplementary footage and images from Art Zupynka expeditions, provided by Olena Vesela.

Art Zupynka | Founded and led by Viktoria Zubenko and Olena Vesela.

Zupynka Redux | Shot by Max Rykov, Olena Vesela, Pavel Sandul. Modeled by Lilit Lisa. 

Zupynka Redux ECHO/BYWAY/FRAGMENT | Print series by Max Rykov & Colton Teri

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Hindsight (deconstructed)

Max Rykov
VHS essay film video installation (6
 min)

Part of PRESERVATION duo-exhibition with Colton Teri.

Washington, D.C., November 2023.

 

A look at the fragility of our roots, the impermanence of our cultures, and the transience of our freedoms through the lens of a traveling VHS camera in the late 1990s. Hindsight offers a visual meditation on the memories of two young Ukrainians emerging from the fall of the Iron Curtain. This installation deconstructs the film between six analog televisions with supplemental text from the original commentary. 

Material was captured by Anna Rykova and Igor Rykov between 1995 and 2004.
AV Support by James Subia.
Installation Support by Colton Teri, Soniya Picard, Jessica LaFratta, Bebe Hanson, Lehna Berg. 

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БЛОК 23

Max Rykov
Video installation (3 min)

Part of Colton Teri's holiday group art exhibition.
Hosted by 7 Locks Brewery in Rockville, MD,
December 2023.


Part 
A look at the brutalist residential architecture of Blok 23 in Novi Belgrade, Serbia through an analog television bound by steel chains. This display serves as a window into the socialist concrete landscape of Belgrade that emerged in post-World War II Yugoslavia. 
As the perspective recedes into the dark depths of these walls, the light grows distant and out of reach. The structures echo the complex narrative of Serbia today – entangled in socio-political shifts as it grapples with post Yugoslav identity.
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